Is Tea Good for Weight loss ? 

  • By 7015203214
  • 29 Jun, 2017
There's lots of hype around tea's benefits—especially when it comes to drinking tea and weight loss. Next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world, and for good reason. Tea is a versatile beverage that can be served hot or cold. Tea also comes in a variety of flavors and it can help quench thirst, wake you up or help you relax. While there are many varieties sold at the store, true teas include green, oolong, black and white. Each true tea is derived from the Camellia sinensis  plant, but the tea leaves are processed differently, which accounts for different colors, flavors and health benefits. But can drinking tea actually help you lose weight?
Tea, specifically green tea, has been touted for its ability to boost metabolism. While tea does contain caffeine and catechins (natural antioxidants said to increase energy expenditure and burn fat), research shows mixed results regarding the use of tea for weight loss and weight maintenance. A 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity  linked catechins in tea to a modest—about three pounds over 12 weeks—weight loss. However, a more recent review study found drinking green tea was not associated with significant weight loss. And, since many studies used concentrations of catechins much greater than what you would get from drinking green tea, further research is needed to support claims of tea aiding in weight loss through increased metabolism. The upside? Drinking unsweetened tea does help keep you hydrated, which can assist with weight loss by preventing overeating caused by mistaking thirst for hunger.
It may not be a magical metabolism booster and weight-loss aid, but tea is still a pretty healthy beverage! Drinking tea, including herbal teas, has a plethora of proven health benefits. Different teas can help settle your stomach, keep your heart healthy, lower your risk of diabetes, help you focus, help you sleep and lower stroke risk.

So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal  of Hypertension . Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function . And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.

If you do drink tea, be sure not to cancel out some of the benefits of by dumping sugar or honey into your morning or afternoon cup. A little bit of sweetener is OK if that's your preference, but order a green tea latte out and you could be looking at 30 grams (more than 2 tablespoons) of sugar—about half of which is added sugar. Bottled iced teas, sweet tea, chai tea and matcha tea lattes all may contain lots of added sugar. Added sugar adds extra calories without any nutrition, and too much added sugar can hinder your weight-loss efforts. When ordering tea, whether hot or iced, opt for unsweetened versions to reap the most nutritional benefit from your tea. And, remember, while tea may not yet be proven to directly aid in weight loss, it is a good choice to include for its countless other health and hydration benefits.
Article copied from : eatingwell.com  

Branch & Vine Events and News

By 7015203214 03 Oct, 2017

Black Tea

People who drank 20 ounces of plain black tea daily over 15 weeks improved markers of heart health and decreased their fasting blood glucose, lowering their risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Preventive Medicine  in May 2012. Researchers think the catechins in black tea help keep your heart healthy by lowering triglycerides (fatty compounds found in your blood) and arming your body with antioxidants (which fight cell-damaging free radicals). With more caffeine than other teas, black tea may also help keep you on your toes. In another study, people given a cup of black tea were more focused and accurate at detailed tasks.

By 7015203214 29 Jun, 2017
There's lots of hype around tea's benefits—especially when it comes to drinking tea and weight loss. Next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world, and for good reason. Tea is a versatile beverage that can be served hot or cold. Tea also comes in a variety of flavors and it can help quench thirst, wake you up or help you relax. While there are many varieties sold at the store, true teas include green, oolong, black and white. Each true tea is derived from the Camellia sinensis  plant, but the tea leaves are processed differently, which accounts for different colors, flavors and health benefits. But can drinking tea actually help you lose weight?
Tea, specifically green tea, has been touted for its ability to boost metabolism. While tea does contain caffeine and catechins (natural antioxidants said to increase energy expenditure and burn fat), research shows mixed results regarding the use of tea for weight loss and weight maintenance. A 2009 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity  linked catechins in tea to a modest—about three pounds over 12 weeks—weight loss. However, a more recent review study found drinking green tea was not associated with significant weight loss. And, since many studies used concentrations of catechins much greater than what you would get from drinking green tea, further research is needed to support claims of tea aiding in weight loss through increased metabolism. The upside? Drinking unsweetened tea does help keep you hydrated, which can assist with weight loss by preventing overeating caused by mistaking thirst for hunger.
It may not be a magical metabolism booster and weight-loss aid, but tea is still a pretty healthy beverage! Drinking tea, including herbal teas, has a plethora of proven health benefits. Different teas can help settle your stomach, keep your heart healthy, lower your risk of diabetes, help you focus, help you sleep and lower stroke risk.

So even if tea doesn't help you lose weight, there are plenty of other reasons to drink up. Drinking black tea, which is high in flavonoids, was tied to improved cardiovascular function in a small study in the Journal  of Hypertension . Both black and green tea were shown to decrease risk of stroke and coronary heart disease in another study from Food & Function . And a 13-year study of nearly 40,000 people in the Netherlands found that those who drank tea frequently had a lower risk of heart disease-related death compared to people who didn't drink tea. While the four varieties of true teas tend to provide highest concentrations of antioxidants, herbal teas have also been linked to better heart health (hibiscus tea in particular) and other benefits.

If you do drink tea, be sure not to cancel out some of the benefits of by dumping sugar or honey into your morning or afternoon cup. A little bit of sweetener is OK if that's your preference, but order a green tea latte out and you could be looking at 30 grams (more than 2 tablespoons) of sugar—about half of which is added sugar. Bottled iced teas, sweet tea, chai tea and matcha tea lattes all may contain lots of added sugar. Added sugar adds extra calories without any nutrition, and too much added sugar can hinder your weight-loss efforts. When ordering tea, whether hot or iced, opt for unsweetened versions to reap the most nutritional benefit from your tea. And, remember, while tea may not yet be proven to directly aid in weight loss, it is a good choice to include for its countless other health and hydration benefits.
Article copied from : eatingwell.com  
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